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Style Notes: 30 Years Of Men's Fashion Feat. Versace And Marcelo Burlon

Style Notes: 30 Years Of Men's Fashion Feat. Versace And Marcelo Burlon

From fine Italian suits to the pop-culture references of Jeremy Scott’s Moschino. From the decadence of Versace and the street style aesthetic of Marcelo Burlon, to the understated luxury of Missoni and Marni, Italian fashion has many guises. But one thing unites them all: Italian design and craftsmanship. Made in Italy, these are clothes imbued with the spirit of the country, la dolce vita, of living well and dressing better.

Image: complete outfit by Vivienne Westwood, courtesy of Pitti Imagine

A flatlay of a complete men's outfit by Fausto Puglisi including a studded leather jacket, jeans with patches and black leather sandals
A flatlay of a complete men's outfit by Fausto Puglisi including a studded leather jacket, jeans with patches and black leather sandals

To celebrate its 30th year in business, Pitti Uomo, the world’s most famous menswear trade show held bi-annually in Florence, is hosting a retrospective exhibition celebrating 30 years of menswear from Italy and beyond. Titled 1989-2019: Thirty Years of Men’s Fashion, it will tell the stories of designers past and present who have featured on the schedule. Contributors to the exhibition include JW Anderson, Dolce & Gabbana, Giorgio Armani, Neil Barrett, Hugo Boss, Kenzo, Martin Margiela, Moncler, Stone Island, Vivienne Westwood and Valentino amongst countless others who have helped shape men’s fashion.

Two flat lays of complete men's outfits by Romeo Gigli and Vivienne Westwood, includign a brown and orange pin stripe suit and a military-inspired distressed knitted jumper over a white shredded shirt
Two flat lays of complete men's outfits by Romeo Gigli and Vivienne Westwood, includign a brown and orange pin stripe suit and a military-inspired distressed knitted jumper over a white shredded shirt

Pitti is a driving force in the industry and one of the fashion calendar’s most important events, with many a young designer cutting their teeth at the shows before becoming established names. Without Pitti, Italian fashion may never have cemented its reputation on the global stage. Milan might have the A-list front rows and glamorous fashion influencer contingent, but Pitti is a machine. It is where the heavyweights go to do business, and where decisions are made about what we all wear for the next six months. “Many of the men, but also the women, who transformed men’s clothing into creative works have passed through Florence,” says curator Olivier Saillard. “In constantly changing settings, classic or bold, and hand-in-hand with the city of Florence and its prestigious locations, these creators of fashion were able to conceive the most over-the-top fashion shows to best serve their collections.”

A flatlay of a men's pair of black suit trousers and the bottom of a black suit jacket with black leather dress shoes by Giorgio Armani
A flatlay of a men's pair of black suit trousers and the bottom of a black suit jacket with black leather dress shoes by Giorgio Armani

Givenchy is a guest designer at this year’s event, with the maison’s Creative Director Claire Waight Keller set to present her first solo menswear show alongside a series of both established and emerging names. The British designer is one of many in a long line to take up the Pitti guest mantle. Previous guest designers include Y3’s Yohji Yamamoto, Raf Simons, Gosha Rubchinskiy and Paul Smith.

Not got an invite? Pitti is famous for its street style. On the agenda: relaxed tailoring, layering and streetwear references inspired by minimalism. Generally more sophisticated than some of the more experimental or trend-led fashion capitals, we recommend staying tuned for a lesson on the history of menswear and some slick style inspiration. It would be a Pitti to miss it.

Images: all courtesy of Pitti Imagine